@

Lidia-Yuknavitch-The-Book-of-Joan

Lidia Yuknavitch is the guest. Her new novel, The Book of Joan, is available now from Harper. It is the official April selection of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

This is Lidia’s third appearance on the podcast. She first appeared on August 5, 2012, in Episode 93, and again on July 15, 2015, in Episode 370. All episodes can be streamed free of charge.

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

Support the show at Patreon or via PayPal.

Get Brad Listi’s sporadic email newsletter.

Ron-Currie-the-one-eyed-man

Now playing on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Ron Currie , author of the novel The One-Eyed Man, available from Viking. The official March selection of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

This is Ron’s second time on the podcast. He first appeared in Episode 4, which aired on September 28, 2011.

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

Support the show at Patreon or via PayPal.

Get Brad Listi’s sporadic email newsletter.

Lindsey-Lee-Johnson-The-Most-Dangerous-Place-on-Earth

Now playing on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Lindsey Lee Johnson . Her debut novel, The Most Dangerous Place on Earth, is available from Random House.

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

Support the show at Patreon.

michelle-tea-black-wave

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Michelle Tea . Her new novel, Black Wave, is available now from Feminist Press.

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

mike-roberts-cannibals-in-love

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Mike Roberts , author of the debut novel  Cannibals in Love, available now from FSG Originals. Roberts also wrote the screenplay for the movie Goat, out in theaters now.

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

rich-ferguson-new-jersey-me

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with TNB Poetry editor Rich Ferguson , whose debut novel, New Jersey Me, is available now from Rare Bird Books / A Barnacle Book. Big congrats to Rich! Go buy his book!

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

nicole_dennis_benn_here_comes_the_sun

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Nicole Dennis-Benn. Her debut novel Here Comes the Sun is available now from Liveright. It is the official September pick of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

 

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

garth_risk_hallberg_city_on_fire

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Garth Risk Hallberg , author of the bestselling novel City on Fire, available now in trade paperback from Vintage.

 

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

margaret_wappler_neon_green

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Margaret Wappler, author of the debut novel Neon Green, available now from The Unnamed Press.

 

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

Jonathan_Franzen_Purity

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a wide-ranging conversation with Jonathan Franzen. His latest novel, Purity, is available now in trade paperback from Picador. It is the official August selection of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club.

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

Sloane_Crosley_The_Clasp

This week on the Otherppl with Brad Listi podcast, a conversation with Sloane Crosley. Her debut novel, The Clasp, is available now in trade paperback from Picador. 

Get the free Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

Dana_Spiotta_Innocents_and_Others

Dana Spiotta is the guest on the latest episode of Otherppl with Brad Listi. Her new novel, Innocents and Others, is available now from Scribner. It is the official May selection of The Nervous Breakdown Book Club. (Photo credit: Erik Madigan Heck, NY Times)

Get the Otherppl app.

Listen via iTunes.

dear-petrov-cover-1I hesitate to call Susan Tepper’s dear Petrov (Pure Slush Books) a novel; if anything it reaches closest to that magical, ethereal and mysterious realm we call poetry, though I also hesitate to call the sixty-four connected, half-page pieces poems, for taken altogether, they construct a beautiful whole that can very well be a novel. And yet…I hesitate…yes, now I’m repeating, having thoroughly locked myself into a savagely incoherent loop. This is so mostly because this book defies a label, and any fool (like this one) who undertakes the futile task of reviewing Tepper’s offering will be left verbally challenged—doomed to spin his wheels in perpetuity, trapped in a circle of babbling nonsense as witnessed above. The closest we can come to pegging down dear Petrov is “a work of art.”

25387388A few years ago a psychologist friend asked me if I was a gambler. Back in my first two years of college in a small Midwestern town—an accidental choice, after all, at least for this East Coast kid—overcome with boredom though periodically buzzing with passels of first-rate psychedelics and crystal meth, I’d play weekend-long poker games, listening to stacks of variously-scratched Rolling Stones LPs in someone else’s dorm room, resulting in lost sleep and most of the cash in my pocket. Each deal on site  was going to be better than the last. Walk away when you’re down? What’s the point of that, eh? Shut up and deal. We do it over and over again, because luck is like some invisible force in the universe: sometimes it’s on your side, and sometimes it isn’t. If you back out, you’ll never know if the next hand’s going to be a royal straight flush. So you ante up and watch the cards sail towards you.

Frederick-BarthelmeFrederick Barthelme is the author of fourteen previous books of fiction. Until 2010, he directed the writing program at the University of Southern Mississippi and Mississippi Review. He now edits New World Writing, an online magazine started in 1995.

I’ve known Barthelme for about twenty years or so, more or less to the day, which would be the day I showed up in Hattiesburg to interview him. Two hours before our scheduled interview I was still scratching out questions in a battered notebook, distracted by a gaggle of teenaged girls tugging at pale bikini tops, USM first year students who I was pretty sure would not wind up in any of his classes but could easily show up somewhere in one of his novels, wisecracking their way through another scene of exquisite and heartrending longing, dialogue going off like cherry bombs through the junk landscape of the Mississippi coast. Later, I’d come on board the old Mississippi Review, which morphed into New World Writing, with brief layovers in something called Rick Magazine, later Stand Away from the Vehicle, and Blip. With the help of some of his former students we’d also put together a private journal of opinion called Public Scrutiny, which died a dignified death some years back. I’m saying I’ve known Barthelme a bit, and publicly raved about his work in various places, particularly his novel The Brothers, featuring Del Tribute and his much younger sidekick Jen, two of his most memorable characters, who team up again in Painted Desert.