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Maintaining a spirit of play as opposed to laboring under the “rules” of writing is a troublesome task. There is an entire industry to teach us the rules. Play, not so much. Inside the playfulness of writing we forge our connection to the reader. It’s behind rules that distance is bred. I was reminded of this over the weekend. I was part of an audience at a gladiatorial arena, also known as a play-date. Surrounded by four- and five-year-olds at the local playground, the other parents and I gave our thumbs-up (“Way to run away from that kicking kid!”) and thumbs-down,  (“Don’t kick that kid in the head!”) responses to children who would have ignored us were we not controlling the purse strings when ice cream rolled our way. I was a solo parent for the weekend, my wife having earned parole in the form of a women’s retreat, and in order to maintain my and my son’s sanity I had orchestrated the gathering with families from my son’s pre-school class. Several classmates came, the weather was Grillmaster hot, and the playground was being tested by three-and-a-half foot tall humans pounding through, on, and around it, water sprinklers and squirt guns in full spray.

Part of the fun with a group such as ours is watching four-year-olds develop game rules. The term “game” makes it sound more structured that it actually is. Running from one platform to another on a jungle-gym, down a staircase, up a ladder, repeat. That was the game. Occasionally we spin this valve wheel that connects to nothing also seemed to be a requirement, though not as critical as squealing.  At one point my son and a classmate, a girl, followed one another up and down stairs and slides, repeated the “open or close the main drain” valve spin, and spoke in whispers. There was a fake door painted onto the side of a barricade that they returned to again and again, the girl knocking, calling, “Open the door.” My son, on the other side, never could figure out what door she was referring to. On one of their trips to the valve I heard my son yelling, “Kill it! Kill it,” as the girl spun the wheel.

When it was time for ice cream (why isn’t there a “whiskey truck” that could arrive outside the park, its clarion playing something like “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling”?) the girl’s mother approached the two of them and asked first if they would like some ice cream (don’t even pretend you don’t know the answer) and second, “What game are you playing.”

“House,” answered the girl.

“Pirates,” answered my son.

That they were not playing the same game did not mean they weren’t playing the same game. The rules, as they understood them, were fluid. I have seen a lot of this lately, in my son’s play with classmates and friends, at school and at birthday parties. The block tower is a building and a rocket. The garbage truck is a robot and a monster. The thing chasing them is huge, small, invisible, spotted, flying, crawling. It doesn’t alter the outcome (what is the “outcome” after all) and it doesn’t ruin the enjoyment for either. It is the spirit of play that is important, a spirit that harbors a willingness to accept the differences and hinge the hard work of caring for a pirate house on the similarities. It is that spirit that I already mourn being “ruled” out of my son and his friends.

After the ice cream had been eaten I wondered about my own spirit of play, my own willingness to eschew “rules” of what is acceptable in order to simply enjoy the moment. I realized that I find a great deal of play is at work in writing and reading. An author only provides half of the context of the work in question. The other half is brought by the reader. We have the rules of sentences, paragraphs, and expectations of form and genre. If one of the players finds the other not playing within the spirit of the game they will leave. Readers will abandon a book when they no longer enjoy a style, a genre or a conventional plot. What happens when an author abandons the game? They change styles, or genre, or subject. They adopt a pen name.

The social contract at work when a book is picked up is no different than playing Pirate House. Both parties understand a game has begun, and both will travel through the story hand in hand, knowing that the words stand in for the essences the players carry inside their heads. A character described will be brought out of an author, taken in by a reader. Is it the same character? Certainly not, but yes, enough. The thingness of objects is impossible to convey; how blue a blue, how hard a stone, how deep a river, each thing is particular to the one imagining, envisioning. One might never reach the end of possible details, nor even get to the “perfect” one to share. I tell my reader a character runs along a dark hallway. Is it the same hallway I imagine? Is the character they have the same I have? No. But, yes.

It’s that agreement to not worry about difference that makes movies and television a different experience. No matter how I might try, as a viewer, I provide nothing. As a reader, I provide the world, my life, my experience. When I am told the main character hoped for something more desperately than she had ever hoped for something before, I know what that means, even if all I ever hoped for was a really great piece of pie. I know hope. I provide it to the character. I know hallways, and rivers, and stones. And if I’ve never seen a hallway or river or stone I still bring it to the book, I still bring the thingness of objects in the story, even if, especially if, I don’t have a particular instance in me to rely upon. I fit the story into my context, the story does not fit me into it.

It’s for that reason I worry about the “enhancement” of the reading experience through linked books in e-readers. Hyperlinks to “expand” a reader’s experience of a book, connecting me to Wikipedia or Google or CNN, may provide me with data, but will they add to the reading experience, or morph it into the passivity of film and television? To link means a choice is made. No longer my experience informing the book, but data informing me. I’m no longer playing Pirate House. I have to choose. This rock, that river. Will Moby Dick be improved by links to images of sailing ships and whales? Does Huckleberry Finn require a map of the Mississippi? Do I need to know what Anne Frank looked like to understand horror, fear, suffering?

There is play and there is data.

I know which I think is more valuable.

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Sean Ferrell SEAN FERRELL is the author of Man in the Empty Suit (Soho Press, 2013) and Numb (HarperPerennial, August 2010). His short fiction has appeared in The Cafe Irreal and won the Fulton Prize from The Adirondack review. He lives and works, in no particular order, in New York City. You can find him online at www.seanferrell.com

8 Responses to “Playing Pirate House”

  1. CKHB says:

    “Everybody makes their own fun. If you don’t make it yourself, it isn’t fun. It’s entertainment. ” — David Mamet

    Right there with you. I’ll take fun over entertainment any day.

  2. Patty Blount says:

    Sean, what an insightful essay… reminds me of something Stephen King said in On Writing that writing is “telepathy”. I’m here (a reader). You’re there (the writer). You transmit ideas from your head into mine. It’s magic, isn’t it? But you’re right; my image won’t identically match your image, and that’s okay. That’s the fun part. Great post.

  3. Dana says:

    Very interesting Sean. I wonder if in the end it’ll all boil down to what we’re used to or essentially our age. When considering the possibility of links inserted in a favorite book it seems like it would be so intrusive. And such a distraction!! (Haven’t we all ended up on a webpage and wondered how the hell we got there?) On the other hand if the links could be ignored (by command) and then highlighted at the readers direction to enhance the experience after the first read, I can imagine that to be a wonderful tool to enhance my experience.

    “There was a fake door painted onto the side of a barricade that they returned to again and again, the girl knocking, calling, “Open the door.” My son, on the other side, never could figure out what door she was referring to. On one of their trips to the valve I heard my son yelling, “Kill it! Kill it,” as the girl spun the wheel.” <— Awesome!

  4. Jordan Ancel says:

    Welcome to TNB, Sean.

    Excellent first post. I think you make a great point about linking in an e-book, or other online writing. For me it does take me out of the experience of fully immersing myself in what I’m reading.

    I have a short attention span, and if I link to something from what I’ve been reading, I then get onto something else, then something else, then something so far removed that I have to go back to what I was reading and start again, having forgotten everything.

    This was made clear to me when I read J.M. Blaine’s Whitney Houston, We Have a Problem when I clicked on a link designated by the letter S at the end of a word. I was curious as to why only the S was a link and not the whole word, so I had to check.

    Needless to say, I got distracted for about 20 minutes looking at the Suicide Girls website. I’m not really into porn, but, dammitt, man, SUICIDE GIRLS!

    I totally forgot about what I’d read.

    You also bring up another important question: why isn’t there a whiskey truck?

  5. “Will Moby Dick be improved by links to images of sailing ships and whales? Does Huckleberry Finn require a map of the Mississippi? Do I need to know what Anne Frank looked like to understand horror, fear, suffering?”

    That’s it. I’m coming to New York, and I’m jumping on you.

  6. Art Edwards says:

    Don’t we get enough pictures elsewhere?

    I don’t expect to value the future of books more than the past of books–the book is pretty perfect as it is–but I’m willing to be proven wrong.

    Welcome, Sean.

    Art

    • Tiago says:

      Happy Halloween!Thank you so much for posting the pcriute and note about your night with Madi and Sean! They look adorable as always; hope they had a good time! But sorry that there were tears (yours!).On Friday, Dad will bring some clothes and a Cinderella dress for Madi from AD. Love to you all,Mom/Gramie

  7. Lynn says:

    Love this essay, Sean. Welcome.

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