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Anna Wood ANNA WOOD is a writer, journalist and yoga instructor based in Istanbul, Turkey. She holds a BA in history and pre-law from Columbia University, where she spent many of her better hours in the creative writing department. She reports on politics, human rights and culture in Turkey for several publications, including the Southeast European Times. Her fiction has appeared in the journal Line Zero, and her novella A Place Worth Getting To was longlisted for Shakespeare & Co.’s Paris Literary Prize in 2011. She is currently at work on a novel. You can follow her on Twitter, @annaw00d.

Recent Work By Anna Wood

The day’s first sound was its most abrasive, the bell’s vibrations heavy in the pre-dawn mountain thick. The tolling came closer, so close it was no longer possible to assimilate it into dream, and faded, leaving the air behind it changed. The subsequent lull was slowly filled with the shuffling of blankets against bundled bodies, clumsy footsteps making their way to the light switch by the cabin door, the swishes of clothing being doffed and donned, the key in the latch.

Tear gas, for the uninitiated, really does make you cry.

And not in the gradual fashion of an organic cry, with the palpable build-up of liquid emotion that your body ultimately can’t contain and spills out onto your cheeks, your shirt, your lover’s shoulder.

Prior to our firsts, we call ourselves virgins. Afterwards, we call ourselves people. This transition serves as one of the basic story arcs in western literature, the crux of our mythologies and our odes, the drama of our novels and climaxes of our plays. It has formed the backbone of our libraries from the time of parchment to the age of the printing press, and it remains a viable tale even in the age of the e-book.